Memories - Spring 2016

Memories of Arrowbear’s early years

 

I remember a Saturday morning in 1942 at Franklin Jr. High School in Long Beach when we were having an All City high school rehearsal and Mr. Ohlendorf said, “How would you all like to go to a music camp?” Our eyes beamed, a music camp? We all got excited, and he explained that his in-laws had a church camp up at Arrowbear, CA. So that was the beginning of the Arrowbear Music Camp.

We all met at Poly High School. Up drove Mr. Ohlendorf in a rented stake-side truck. He was having trouble with it, and my dad, William Sippel, went and asked him if he needed some help. Mr. Ohlendorf said yes, and the next thing I knew he and we were off. That was the beginning of my parent’s relationship with the Ohlendorfs and Music Camp for well over 30 years. My dad went to camp to do repairs or whatever needed to be done, and my mother went up several summer to help in the kitchen. During the war, I remember that we had to give up some of our ration stamps in order to get gas and food for camp.

I went to camp for five years. My brother, Marvin Sippel, and my sister Evelyn Sippel Baeyens also went for several years. Marvin was also on the staff for some time. Every New Year’s Eve, Mr. Ohlendorf would come to our home with a small gift to thank my parents. I have many fond memories of the Ohlendorfs and Music Camp. Vina Mae Sippel Woodland.

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I played French horn at both junior high and senior high camps from 1945-1951. I participated in many weekend work parties with my parents, Bill & Vera Sippel. My father, Bill, drove the stake bed truck the first year of camp and many more subsequent years. My mother worked in the kitchen over several summers. I also served as a junior high counselor for two years. I helped take the camp trash to the dump using Fred’s car and trailer. I have a memory of riding in Fred Ohlendorf’s Willy’s coupe with the large trunk filled with instruments and sometimes all of us too for All City Senior high orchestra and All Southern orchestra rehearsals. Wow, what a ride! - Marvin Sippel

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Richard Cummings (58-62) remembers that while he was at camp, Ricky and Carole Ohlendorf were his age, and they went on outings in the back of a flatbed truck with sideboards. Maestro Akira Endo was a young counselor. His father, Stanley Cummings, tuned for the Ohlendorfs and for the camp. He has many happy memories of camp and was familiar with the infamous and forbidden “Happy Gap”! Richard was a tuner for Long Beach City College.


Memories - Fall 2015

After being a camper for several years through junior high and high school, I was a counselor after my graduation in 1963. Mr. O. discovered I was mechanically inclined and fairly handy with my hands. That was the year the staff cabin above the parking lot was being constructed. He had me and another counselor do a lot of the “behind the scenes” work in the cabin, including putting the insulation in the walls and laying the subfloor before the experts came in to do the drywall and finish flooring. I also corrected some of the unsafe wiring in the back wall of the dining hall, and built steps behind the outside porch of the boys’ dorm which eliminated a big drop off. The porch had ben unsafe for years.

Oh, and I did get to do some music besides all the mechanical work and lead some smaller instrumental groups preparing for the musicales. Four of us counselors were clarinet players that year and we played clarinet quartet music for several of the musicales, sometimes in a humorous manner, stopping in mid-phrase to turn pages, etc. We were never sure Mr. O. appreciated our humorous efforts, but the campers seemed to.

It was probably my most fun year at Arrowbear. After that, a college physics education got in the way and I never returned to Arrowbear as a counselor or staff member. I am glad to find out that it was still in operation and hope I am able to return and bring back some more memories. -  Roger West

Memories

In the early 80s, we drove our daughter, Heidi Umber, to an Arrowbear Camp Reunion. This took place on November 11. Unfortunately, there was an early snowfall and there was enough snow to shut off traffic to the village and the camp. Our cars were halted and the students tramped through the snow carrying their instruments to the camp. The Reunion was a happy one and one they will always remember. Wallace Umber – Parent

As a junior high and high school camper between the late 1950s and the early 1960s, I spent time with Akira as one of our counselors. As a young fellow not much older than I, Akira’s mastery of music and the violin was a great influence in my future music life. After college, I continued playing in civic orchestras and concert bands throughout my adult years until recently when arthritis and other joint problems unfortunately forced me to abandon my music hobby.

My parents had just bought a Wollensak reel-to-reel tape recorder for me to record my school performances and I was lucky enough to have them bring it to one of our weekend Arrowbear concerts. I was fortunate that Akira allowed me to tape him playing his violin at one of our evening musicals. Everyone in the audience was amazed at his virtuosity at such a young age. Somewhere in the dark reaches of my garage storage is a reel of tape with Akira’s concert on it along with the concerts at Arrowbear that year. Unfortunately, I have no reel-to-reel tape deck to play it on anymore. I was very sorry to read of Akira’s passing. He was truly a great person. - Roger West

Arrowbear Music Camp – 10th Anniversary Edition - 1951
 

This, the tenth season at Arrowbear Music Camp, has been the most significant one in our history. Two hundred-forty campers attended camp for a musical vacation. More visitors and music lovers visited us than ever before. For this enthusiastic interest we are all most grateful.

We hope the past two weeks have been enjoyable and worthwhile. This has been a camp with remarkable talent. The standard of performance has been exceptional outstanding in our history at Arrowbear Music Camp. With your continued support, we should be able to maintain this and it is our hope that you will continue to grow in the beauties of music and make the message of music a vital force in the lives of people in your schools and communities.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Fred Ohlendorf
 

The Staff

Fred Ohlendorf is camp director. He loves to tease and is a good sport about “name calling”. Besides being supervisor of instrumental music in the L.B. Public Schools, he is skilled in everything from flipping flapjacks to digging ditches.

Edna Ohlendorf is “chief cook and bottle washer” plus being secretary –treasurer of the camp. She is also a busy mother of Carole and Ricky.

James Mitchell has long been teased for his loud shirts and crew cut. He inhabits the beach; is it for the sun? He is a music director at Jefferson Jr. High.

Harriet Dorrans is our nurse. She is a good natured person and is invaluable at the dances. She is also a busy mother to Janet and David. She also has a very handsome husband who frequently comes up for short visits.

Pauline Shoup graduated from Redlands and will be a special music teacher in the L.B. Public Schools starting this fall. Rumors have been flying about her, but we all know they aren’t true, or are they, Dick?...

Dick Waller will continue his education next fall by going to college in L.A. That will be close enough for a quick drive to L.B. to see Pauline, of course.

Phillip Ellithorpe is choir director at Wilson High. He is the “sleeper” or “dreamer” of the staff as clearly shown in the Stunt Night skit.

Lou Cimbalo came to teach in the L.B. schools from Rochester N.Y. He makes up the bassoon section in the camp orchestra. His charming wife, Margaret, helps out in the viola section.

Joe Gough teaches in L.B. also. He even has his own studio. He is a big flirt here at camp. Let’s hope it is just here!

Nick Furjanick is music director at Wilson High. He is a well-loved member of the staff here, and his directing is well-liked. His charming wife is a vital person here. She not only is an “interior decorator” but is also another busy mother of Molly Jo and Nick Jr., known as Binker.

            Many thanks to Anne Bertsch DeBoute (47-52) for sending this to us so we could share it with all of you.


Music Camp Notes

From the First Session of Arrowbear – August 9 to 16, 1942

Musical Activities

One of the main features of our Camp was the full orchestra rehearsal which took place at 8:30 o’clock each morning for one hour and fifteen minutes. This consisted of 52 pieces under the direction of Mr. Fred Ohlendorf, assisted by Messrs. Carl Lindgren, Sterling Smith, and William Gould.

Saturday afternoon, after rehearsing faithfully throughout the week, the orchestra gave the outside world a chance to admire its achievements by giving a very fine concert at Big Bear.

The Little Symphony was composed of the more advanced members of the Camp Orchestra who desired to obtain as much musical experience as possible throughout heir week at camp. This group played more difficult music, and was under the baton of Mr. Ohlendorf.

The members of the Camp Dance Band rehearsed every afternoon. They were greatly fascinated by the direction of Mr. Carl Lindgren who all too patiently worked out their strenuous passages. The vocalist of the band was Bebe Freidin, the newfound songstress of our camp. She and the band members gave “hep” to our feet Saturday night as a farewell salute.

But to every camper the loveliest part of the program was the slumber music which was heard every evening following taps. In turn, separate sections of our orchestra gave up warm beds to lull us to sleep with soft, beautiful music which dimly echoed through the hills.

Mr. Ohlendorf and his assistants have given us something besides bed bugs and pogo sticks to take home with us. They have given us many new friends and a musical experience and inspiration that will stay with us throughout our lives.

Concert Program

Gnome’s March                         Ketelby

Flute Quartet:                             Sterling Smith, Dorothy Leevers, Nora Lee Farris, and Florence Southward

Strausiana                                  Arr. By Seredy

Stoney Point March                  Laurendreau

Oboe Trio:                                   Bruce Bartleson, Caroly Daniels, Flora Holmes

Pavanne                                     Gould

Snare Drum Solo:                      Ralph Campbell

Old Glory Selection                   SaredyTocaben

Inspirational Service

Sunday morning, all campers as well as many parents and guests attended an impressive service in the Bowl. The double string quartet played a movement from a Haydn String Quartet, Bach’s Chorale, “Come, Sweet Death”, and accompanied the audience in church hymns. Carroll Ailman sang a sacred solo. Dr. Mitchell gave a Scripture reading, and Mr. Lindgren addressed the group in a most inspiring and timely message based on the Golden Rule. We left the service greatly edified.

Camp Organization

The camp was organized on a democratic basis. Students were given the privilege of expressing their own ideas and suggestions for the camp program. Groups of ten at six tables formed the system of administration. Each table elected its chairman and these six representatives formed the Camp Council which met daily with the Camp Director. In this way the campers formed their own social and recreational program, as well as other features of a most interesting week of activities.

Many thanks to Alayne Abbott Armstrong for sharing a copy of the Note with us. More to come in the spring!


 

 

 

 

Music Camp Notes

From the First Session of Arrowbear – August 9 to 16, 1942

Musical Activities

One of the main features of our Camp was the full orchestra rehearsal which took place at 8:30 o’clock each morning for one hour and fifteen minutes. This consisted of 52 pieces under the direction of Mr. Fred Ohlendorf, assisted by Messrs. Carl Lindgren, Sterling Smith, and William Gould.

Saturday afternoon, after rehearsing faithfully throughout the week, the orchestra gave the outside world a chance to admire its achievements by giving a very fine concert at Big Bear.

The Little Symphony was composed of the more advanced members of the Camp Orchestra who desired to obtain as much musical experience as possible throughout heir week at camp. This group played more difficult music, and was under the baton of Mr. Ohlendorf.

The members of the Camp Dance Band rehearsed every afternoon. They were greatly fascinated by the direction of Mr. Carl Lindgren who all too patiently worked out their strenuous passages. The vocalist of the band was Bebe Freidin, the newfound songstress of our camp. She and the band members gave “hep” to our feet Saturday night as a farewell salute.

But to every camper the loveliest part of the program was the slumber music which was heard every evening following taps. In turn, separate sections of our orchestra gave up warm beds to lull us to sleep with soft, beautiful music which dimly echoed through the hills.

Mr. Ohlendorf and his assistants have given us something besides bed bugs and pogo sticks to take home with us. They have given us many new friends and a musical experience and inspiration that will stay with us throughout our lives.

Concert Program

Gnome’s March                         Ketelby

Flute Quartet:                             Sterling Smith, Dorothy Leevers, Nora Lee Farris, and Florence Southward

Strausiana                                  Arr. By Seredy

Stoney Point March                  Laurendreau

Oboe Trio:                                   Bruce Bartleson, Caroly Daniels, Flora Holmes

Pavanne                                     Gould

Snare Drum Solo:                      Ralph Campbell

Old Glory Selection                   SaredyTocaben

Inspirational Service

Sunday morning, all campers as well as many parents and guests attended an impressive service in the Bowl. The double string quartet played a movement from a Haydn String Quartet, Bach’s Chorale, “Come, Sweet Death”, and accompanied the audience in church hymns. Carroll Ailman sang a sacred solo. Dr. Mitchell gave a Scripture reading, and Mr. Lindgren addressed the group in a most inspiring and timely message based on the Golden Rule. We left the service greatly edified.

Camp Organization

The camp was organized on a democratic basis. Students were given the privilege of expressing their own ideas and suggestions for the camp program. Groups of ten at six tables formed the system of administration. Each table elected its chairman and these six representatives formed the Camp Council which met daily with the Camp Director. In this way the campers formed their own social and recreational program, as well as other features of a most interesting week of activities.

Many thanks to Alayne Abbott Armstrong for sharing a copy of the Note with us. More to come in the spring!


Music Camp Notes

From the First Session of Arrowbear – August 9 to 16, 1942

Your support has made the first mountain Music Camp in Southern California possible. The excellent musical results for a week of instruction as well as the enthusiastic expressions from you are a convincing indication on the success of the enterprise. Due to the turmoil of the world affairs it is impossible to make plans for the future. However, let us hope that it will be possible to have another camp next year. Making harmonious sounds in the beautiful mountain setting was most impressive. You had the opportunity to live, work, and play in an intimate co-operative setting. It is my hope that you have grown musically, socially, and spiritually in the rich setting of a most enjoyable week.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Fred Ohlendorf     

Mealtime -  Hearing the orchestra play in the outdoor bowl was beautiful indeed. When sectionals and ensembles were rehearsing in all nooks and corners of the camp, one was left bewildered at the resultant sound. However, to hear sixty hungry people together in the dining hall brought forth sounds of joy and satisfaction which even a modern symphony orchestra cannot imitate. The reason – ask any camper, especially George Barlow! Boy, those meals were super! Steaks, ham, meat loaf, spaghetti, pancakes, and French toast in extra deluxe quality and quantity. Our admiration and gratitude go out to the cooks. Long Live The Cooks!

Girls’ Dorm -  The most notable of the sections was Room 5. The girls occupying it were caught doing something outside the rules almost every night. This required them to do K.P. duty each time. The offenses included everything from eating peaches in bed to forgetting to hang up wet bathing suits.

Boys’ Dorm -  The quietest (?) and neatest (?) part of the camp was the boys’ dorm. No sounds were ever heard after midnight. In fact, those nice, peaceful boys were riled only by those noisy inconsiderate girls. A good example of this was the night the girls slept outdoors. The giggling and the ping-pong games that went on at this time aroused many comments from the boys’ dorm. The person in charge of these little angels was Camp Dean Lindy.

Recreation -  Recreation began at 1:30 p.m. when all piled into the truck to go to Green Valley Lake to go swimming, boating, and horseback riding. One of the most enjoyable larks of the week was the snipe hunt. Saturday night ten young innocents took bags and flashlights to go snipe hunting. They were led by a group of heartless rouges who left them calling, “Here, snipey; here, snipey,” up the mountainside.

The Truck -  Camp was enjoyable due to the interesting personalities attending. One character, though impersonal yet most dynamic, was the Dodge Truck which brought 29 campers from Long Beach. The truck was our daily associate, taking us to Green Valley Lake every afternoon and to Big Bear for the Concert on Saturday. We are indebted to Mr. Sippel for bringing us to camp. Then Mr. Ohlendorf took the wheel. He became an expert truck driver after some jerky experiences up and around the narrow and steep roads.

Camp Faculty: Fred Ohlendorf, Carl Lindgren, Sterling Smith, William Gould, Helen Bicknell, Charlotte Brejcha.

Camp Notes Staff: Editor-Carolyn Daniels, Reporters-Jackie Blau, Patty Dodds, Alan Harder, Bernice Mitchell, Billy Watilo.

Many thanks to Alayne Abbott Armstrong for sharing a copy of the Note with us. More to come in the fall!


Arrowbear Memories

Carl Lindgren was at Arrowbear as a staff member from 1941 (I think this was the first year) to 1947. Around 1943, he took a leave of absence as a history teacher at Wilson High in Long Beach to serve with the USO in the Pacific Theatre. He entertained the troops. He could play anything on the piano and loved jazz piano especially. He led the jazz band at Arrowbear and served in many other capacities. He had a fabulous personality and the young people adored him. He was engaged to be married at 47 years of age, but died of a brain tumor that year.

My memories of Arrowbear are still sharp and poignant though I am 78 years old. I played the violin throughout elementary, junior high, high school, college, as a mother and homemaker with the Glendale College Community Orchestra, and as a teacher and principal in the Los Angeles Unified School District. My five children were all musicians. My years at Arrowbear were what led to these many enjoyable experiences in music.

Onto my memories: The first thing I remember was being driven in an OPEN truck with probably 20 or 30 other kids! That was fun and exhilarating as we drove up the mountains. Practicing for hours with the orchestra in that open air setting was thrilling. The sounds reverberated through the boulders, the fresh air, and the trees. Mr. Ohlendorf or Nic Furjanick were the orchestra leaders I remember taps at night with the echoing, beautiful sounds of a single trumpet followed by a small ensemble of strings, woodwinds, or brass in maybe a 15 minute concert.

The jazz band (or swing band it was probably called) practiced in the afternoon inside a small building. Carl Lindgren was the leader of this and it was fabulous. I remember songs like Stormy Weather and Long Ago and Far Away, probably because I was chosen to be the soloist one year and sang these two. We traveled to the Lake Arrowhead Casino and performed a free jazz concert where I forgot the words to Long Ago and Far Away. We also performed one year at the old Stillwell's Restaurant on Big Bear Lake. I remember the servicemen dancing with the local girls. Carl also had a large repertory of real jazz and could he interpret and lead!

I remember the cafeteria with its delicious food such as hamburgers, spaghetti, and pizza. In my home we only had chicken, rabbit, fried liver and onions, fish, and other healthy foods. I remember Skit Nights in the cafeteria where each table wrote and presented their skit. I think the prize was you didn't have to clear the table.

I don’t know if Fred Ohlendorf was a music teacher in the Long Beach Schools, maybe Wilson, but I assume that's where my uncle, Carl Lindgren, met him. Carl was also in the USC Marching band (I don't even know what instrument he played) and a good friend there of the Director, Clarence Sawhill. I know Carl influenced some of the Arrowbear musicians to attend USC.

Carl Lindgren certainly contributed to Arrowbear Music Camp, and I hope some of the campers there at that time remember him with love and appreciation.


                                                                                                                                                                                        Sincerely,
                                                                                                                                                                                        Bernice Mitchell Hallam
                                                                                                                                                                                        Camper 1942-1947

Food for the Soul


Many thanks to Dolores DelComa for sending a program for a concert presented by the Long Beach Philharmonic Orchestra, Robert Resta Conductor. The concert was on December 4, 1942, in the Long Beach Municipal Auditorium and was dedicated to the United States Navy. The concert master was Nicholas Furjanick and included a viola player named Fred Ohlendorf. It has advertisements for private teachers Dorothy Judy Klein, Leah Seykora, Ahavny Torosian, Alice Durham, and Alice Spellings. There’s even an ad for Morey’s Music Store on Pine Avenue with a phone number that is only five digits long instead of seven. The cost for a Patron Membership was $4.40 (including tax) for two tickets to each of the two remaining concerts. The concert on June 11 would feature Camilla Wicks as a guest soloist. Most notable is a quote attributed to T.A. Strang, M.D. , President, Board of Directors, who also played violin in the orchestra:
 

Music has been so defined, and it certainly offers to us all a welcome refuge from the unpleasant realities of a war-torn world. Musicians, and those who enjoy fine music, are indeed fortunate, for when life becomes ugly or distorted they can always find a peaceful haven in this art. Fritz Kriesler has said, “Sometimes when I think of the beauty that is being destroyed in the world today—the ideals that lie in wreckage—it seems almost more than one can bear. But when I turn to my music, all the ugliness disappears. It acts like magic. I can pick up a score of Beethoven, look at the notes, and I live once more in beauty. Hatred and death seem to vanish for a while.”


Arrowbear Quiz

1. What was the first year for Arrowbear Music Camp?

a. 1941

b. 1942

c. 1943

2. Which person is honored with a plaque on the Wall of Honor on the back of the Orchestra Bowl?

a. Michael Pappone

b. Mr. Ohlendorf

c. Akira Endo

3. Which generation of campers donated the large bronze plaque honoring Mr. and Mrs. Ohlendorf that is in the planter behind the Orchestra Bowl?

a. 1940s

b. 1950s

c. 1960s

4. Who originally owned the land that would become Arrowbear?

a. Mr. Ohlendorf

b. Mr. Ohlendorf’s family

c. Mrs.  Ohlendorf’s parents

5. What are the only original buildings still left in camp?

a. dining hall and kitchen

b. “A” and “O” buildings

c. staff cabins

6. Who designed the cover for the NOTE?

a. Mr. Burger

b. Rick Ohlendorf

c. Breck Dockstader

7. What year was the first Choral Session?

a. 1954

b. 1955

c. 1956

8. What year was there a huge fire in the San Bernardino mountains that caused the evacuation of Arrowbear and Running Springs?

a. 2001

b. 2002

c. 2003

9. What year was the Jazz Improv Session added to the Camp’s summer sessions?

a. 2004

b. 2005

c. 2006

Click here for answers


Work Weekend 2005


Howdy, Happy Campers! It’s spring cleaning time at Arrowbear Music Camp. This winter was a tough one so there’s a little extra work to do. Work weekends this year will be held:

May 28-30 (Memorial weekend), June 4-5, and June 11-12.

This will be a really beautiful time of year in our mountains as the spring flowers will be in full bloom. Take a hike while you’re there! Come for an hour, come for a day, or stay all weekend – any help is appreciated! Meals will be served Saturday morning through Sunday afternoon (through Monday afternoon for Memorial Day weekend.) You may arrive Friday evening, but meals will be on your own.

Specific tasks on our priority list this year are: repairing the grounds from this winter’s damage, raking, painting, repairing roofs, sprucing up the boys’ dorm, and general camp clean-up. If you’ve got a specific skill, or even a pet peeve you’d like to work on, please contact Dennis and Carole. In an effort to help us plan for food and sleeping accommodations, please RSVP at info@arrowbear.com or call toll free (877) 867-4511. See you there!


Arrowbear Memories Part II - Spring 2004

In our Fall Newsletter, we printed several memories from campers who went to Arrowbear last summer. There wasn’t enough room to include them all last time, so here are some more for you to enjoy.


One of the things (though no longer there :( ) that gave me SO many memories was playing basketball. What was so special? It was doing this the first day that sparked many of the relationships that flourished throughout the session. I came to camp wearing a Shaquille O'Neal shirt (big sports fan I am), and was one of, if not the biggest kid there. So when playing basketball, I pretended to be Shaq - muscling out all the rebounds, towering over everyone else, and doing an exaggerated impresssion of a Shaq freethrow. A few of my friends became Kobe, Rasheed Wallace and other NBA players...Shortly after becoming 'Shaq' during basketball, I was given the nickname 'Bass.' That came from being one of the bigger kids there and doing Shaq impersonations in a really low voice. The rest of the session all of my friends referred to me as 'Bass.'

Matthew Kwong


My big Arrowbear memory occurred when we made Jewish cookies during rec. My friend Erin Christovale and I were sharing a glass of milk. We took a bite of one of them and we really, really, really needed milk. So we were fighting over the glass of milk ,and I took a sip and she said something really funny. I laughed so hard that the milk came out of my nose. It was great! Soo funny! That’s my story!

Katherine Hoffman


This was my first year at Arrowbear, and it's all I've been yapping about all summer. I don't even have to hesitate to say I'll be going back next year. I remember specifically at campfire how many people said Arrowbear was a relief and going home was going to be tough to get through. I think that must be because of all the wonderful people who inhabited the camp with them over the two weeks. Friends. That's something I won't forget. Friends shared good times and bad times.. but it was always together. My most fond memories of Arrowbear had to be the good and humorous times.

With all the talk about bears going around camp what else was I supposed to think in the middle of the night? Even the name ArrowBEAR suggests they're around... It had to have been one or so in the morning and there was a loud crash. I'm surprised no one else heard it. But I shrugged it off, nevertheless burying myself a little farther into my sleeping bag. Not too soon later, there was a grunt and a snort... something resembling a roar, only faint. All signs were pointing to one thing; a bear. In the girl's cabin. I was so frightened. My heart was beating faster than I could count! I was trembling and refused to so much as peak out of the window. I was sure the bear would catch a glimpse of me. Somehow, I managed to fall back asleep.

I think I was surprised when I woke to reveille playing in the morning. I was fine... so was everyone else and no one was chattering about the bear. I was frantic, nearly ready to yell, "THERE WAS A BEAR! DIDN'T ANYONE ELSE HEAR IT?!" But before I had the chance, my eyes caught the one girl in Cabin 2 still asleep and ... snoring. Juli. I blushed to myself as I realized the familiarity of the girl's snore, or should I say, the fearsome bear's roar.  Cabin 2 seemed to find it quite amusing. Allie laughed, Rachel rolled around on the floor, and even Carolyn was doubling over with laughter. Shame on Naihla who also found herself chortling at me. And who could forget the fearsome Juli... who apologized so many times. To conclude, I'll NEVER forget that time. When the time came to share it at campfire, I could hardly bring myself to say it with a straight face.

Jessica Mantel


Memories from Current Arrowbearites


We asked some campers from this summer to share some of their best memories of camp. Some may only make complete sense to those who were there. You all have memories like that too.


Sometime, in the later part of our first week up at camp, Conductor Val Jamora let the band (lots of fun, I'll never forget!) out on time and Stephen Tucker was holding the orchestra over. I think it may have been the night of the first dance, but it was the evening rehearsal. Flute in hand, apparently I'd left the case in the dorm, I walked across the bridge and saw that the orchestra was still rehearsing, so I sat down to watch. For what I was later told was 45 minutes, I sat and watched, just taking it all in. I remembered what it had been like my first year up here, and the second, both on violin, this year, the third, on flute. It's such a different experience, I hadn't realized how much I missed playing in an orchestra.

Stephen finally let the orchestra out, and I got up, a bit sore, and cold, and walked back into the dorm to the "L." One of the girls walked in from the rehearsal and chucked her water bottle against the far wall with a fair amount of anger and did not really shout or yell, but firmly stated "I hate Stephen!" I answered her outburst quietly, saying, "You guys may hate it, but I would give anything to be able to play well enough to be under his baton. I miss it so much.""Oh, Monica," She said, suddenly soft spoken, and hugged me. Tears came, pretty much unbidden, in small rivlets down my cheeks. I don't cry easily, for those of you who saw me fall down/up on the Seth's Peak hike, well, I don't know, but believe me that hurt (I won't soon forget that either.) So, thanks to Stephen, I've decided to pick up my violin again with more enthusiasm this time, working towards being a semi-decent orchestra member. It's a unique experience, I could never leave it behind entirely.

Monica McCallum


Probably one of my favorite campfire songs is "Shooting Star". When I was in intermediate, one of my counselors told my friend Catherine and me a story about how when she was a camper she and the friend that she had at camp would sit by each other and when they sang that song they would pass a rock they picked up off of the ground to each other to symbolize the shooting star. So Catherine and I would always pass one to each other and say "Look, I caught you one". Then this year, Catherine didn't go. I told the story to my friend Lauren, though, and she "caught" and passed me a "shooting star".

Mo


Um, memories... the pool wars, the "What does this mean?" activity, the Coconut Bear, Coffee Time with Ross, and dodging various airborne Ross projectiles.

Nikki


Summer of 2001...Background-1st Intermediate was my first time at Arrowbear. I had only been playing for about 8 or 9 months and was uncertain as to how I'd measure up to the skill levels of the other violinists. I feared having to do things such as playing or acting in front of the camp, and came up to Arrowbear not knowing anyone...

The Session

On the first day, I settled down quickly and made several close friends. Within the first few days I became close with nearly half the dorm (there were a lot of guys- we took up 3 dorms) and found several people each of whom shared many interests with me. The first few days of MUSIC playing were okay. I had trouble sight reading, but soon came to like the pieces we played. One other memory that pops up is the conquering of another one of my fears- PLAYING IN FRONT OF CAMP. 

Fast forward to the last few days of Camp

There was a musical right around the corner (either that day or the next), and one of my friends came up saying that we should play one of the pieces we were going to play at the concert. They seemed delighted at the idea, but I wasn't so sure...having gone up there for a skit and somewhat made a fool of myself already seemed like enough for a first-timer...but they all encouraged me, persuading me it would be fine...so I decided to go for it. That night at the musical, four of my friends (including myself) went up there- 1st, 2nd Violin, Viola, Cello, and my friend who played the trumpet who went up there to "conduct" us. He pulled out--a THREE MUSKETEERS BAR for a baton!! Everything went well.What was so special? In addition to being one of the funny/silly memories of that session, that one also marked somewhat of a mini-accomplishment/reaching of a goal. And although it may not have been all that serious with the candy bar or as impressive as some flashy Violin Concerto, it was a pretty big step for me.

Matthew


Arrowbear's 62nd Summer

Summer is fast approaching. It’s not too late to enroll yourself or your children in a session at Camp. Yes, even you can still enjoy the magic of Arrowbear. The Symphonic Institute is a four day workshop for musicians entering 12th grade through adults. This session consists of reading and professional style rehearsals. The last few summers, this session has been led by well known UC Irvine conductor, Stephen Tucker, who was one of the featured conductors in our last newsletter. Dust off your instrument, relive some old memories, and make plenty of new ones while you get away from your usual routine.


Elementary

(entering grades 4-6) 

July 20 - 26

$400

Intermediate

(entering grades 6-8)

June 26 - July 5

$530

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.

Aug. 21 - 30

$530  

Advanced

(entering grades 9 - 12)

July 6 - 19

$800   (band focus)

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Aug. 3 - 16

$800   (orchestra focus)

Choral

(entering grades 9 - college)

July 27 - Aug. 3

$360

Symphonic

(entering grade 12 to adult)

Aug. 17 - 20

$200


Answers to Arrowbear Quiz

1. b

2. a

3. a

4. c

5. c

6. b

7. a

8. c

9. b